This is where I review books that are meant for adults - that means anyone over the age of 18. Of course, there are those under 18 years old who may find many of these books to their liking, particularly the classics which include most of my favorites. I've been on a mission to read the Pulitzer fiction winners and I think anyone who can understand these books, and many are also required reading in high school, should enjoy these classics. If you have a suggestion for a book you would like to read that you want my review of, I would be happy to assist you.

A new series of books called "Bookshots" created by James Patterson, "Crosskill" was my 1st James Patterson book.

In our overly functioning crazy-busy world, no one has time to read much more than a few columns in a newspaper. And there is a good chance they aren't turning to the 'continued on' page, either. We just don't have enough time for anything so something as short yet complete as a Bookshots novel just may be the new way of the novel.

A novel, a Pulitzer Prize winner, To Kill a Mockingbird is a classic that has lived on for decades and no doubt will continue on its journey.

As irrelevant as it seems to be in some ways in our modern times in others it is equally relevant. Those of us who are educated and against prejudices in any form will recognize the blatant hatred of the good people of Maycomb.

I'm finally getting to the Pulitzer Prize novels that were on my reading list more than a year ago. And the first one I decided to read was Edith Wharton's "The Age of Innocence". Based on the New York rich of the 1900's, the novel swells with the self-importance of its characters whose focus in life appears to be the judging and criticizing of others in their circle, in particular, Madame Olenska. Separated from an abusive husband, Ellen seeks solace and comfort by returning to her family and friends. But if only for conformity reasons and the strict rules of that time , they believe her place is with her husband the tyrant. They all play by the rules of the times and believe she should as well.

Before I went to college, I read Dostoyevsky's "Crime and Punishment". This was my first introduction to Russian authors and I was hooked. From here I read Maxim Gorky's three novels, "My Childhood", "My Apprenticeship", and "My Universities" and several other novels by Tolstoy and others. I've always been drawn to the passion inherent in the works of Russian novelists.

Guinea Hen Gawking

I was pretty sure this would be a good read since it was an Oprah Book Club selection. And I enjoyed it from page one. The main character, Ava Johnson, was sarcastic enough to get my attention.

Returning to your roots usually involves a life-changing journey with many lessons learned along the way. Not only did Ava's experiences change her but some of the characters she met along the way gave her an inner strength she didn't know she possessed. Her sister, Joyce, teaches her about love, compassion, and generosity beyond anything she had ever known.